A split second can be life altering

When

8 May 2019

Collette's 12-year-old son, Alec, was spending the day at home during the summer holidays when he leaned against a large glass window in their dinning room. The glass shattered, and Alec fell straight through, severely cutting his arm and lacerating his body.

"I heard a loud smash and saw Alec laying on the ground outside. The glass was in massive shards. I knew from the amount of blood that we needed help immediately." Collette shared.

When paramedics arrived and assessed Alec's injury, they discovered he had cut an artery and severed tendons in his arm. They knew that tine was critical to get Alec the emergency care he needed. Without it, he was at risk of losing his arm.

Collette recalls Alec's immense pain and panic as her son asked if he was going to die. "I remember it felt so long waiting for paramedics, even though it was only twenty minutes. Alec wanted to sleep, but we kept talking to him, trying to distract him until they arrived. He was in so much pain."

Once at the hospital, doctors assessed Alec's laceration and concluded that he needed specialised emergency surgery if he was going to have use of his arm again. He needed to get to a major hospital.

"There are no second chances, without the Royal Flying Doctor Service, Alec would have lost the use of his arm, or worse, lost his arm altogether." Collette shared.

For families living remotely, when a horrific accident happens, time is critical. They can be hours away from a major hospital or even the closest doctor, the isolation can put their lives at risk. 

The Royal Flying Doctor Service can be the difference between life and death. As Australia's most experienced and expansive aeromedical organisation, the Royal Flying Doctor Service is specially equipped to reach those in the furthest corners of Australia. Like Alec's family in the far West New South Wales.

Thanks to the generosity of people like you, the Royal Flying Doctor Service was able to transport Alec under critical time constraints to receive emergency surgery. With continuous support, we can ensure that the Royal Flying Doctor Service can continue to be there for all children, like Alec, when their life depends on it.